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, but it got your. abigail adams was in the crowd in the intersection and wrote to her husband, john, and said, it was crazy. after the declaration was read. everything british was ripped down and burned in the middle of the intersection immediately after the reading, including the unicorn that flank the eastside that was put up in 1881. but immediately it was one of the first few things that was ripped off the symbols of british authority and burned in the middle of the intersection. so a little rambunctious. in boston. it continued to be, but before that in 1770 come on march 5, the boston massacre happened just outside the intersection as well. something we're very all familiar with and something that bob allison contributed to in the book as well as his own book on that. but another rambunctious event in the city of boston. so just right outside this building itself. now we're going to turn to a panel discussion, which will be in the fashion of question and answer session. this mic in the middle of the aisle here is for you to step up to after questions to the panel. right now going to int
about the archives. john said it and it's true. people like me who want to research american history are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i and my research assistants, including josh israel, who is up there someplace and is going to give us some entertainment with johnson and king talking, could not possibly have gotten as far as we got in trying to unravel this story. without the resources of the archives and the unfailingly courteous, bright, helpful people from the archives. i want to personally thank them not only on behalf of myself but in behalf of other people who work in this field. they are just great. the idea of this book was sort of a gamble. it was a hunch. i wondered -- there have been lots of books written about king. there have been lots of books written about johnson. there have been lots of books written about civil rights, but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day by day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from the kennedy's assassination to the p
of john so sunu. not the chief of staff but i think it's fair to say i'm the only person turned to a career of poetry by john. george h. w. bush presidency was sort of a gray time for those of us in the small joke trade. very bland group of people. i always refer to them as at nice protestant gentleman in constitutes. -- suits. they all sort of looked like. the only person that stood out was john who wasn't in shape like the rest of them. [laughter] also, he had that characteristic that draws the attention of people like me. and that is he was very interested in proving that he was the smartest comby in the room. -- go in the room. that samed to be -- seemed to be his main aim in life. and ed roll lynns, the political campaign manager once said that john is an argument against telling your child that he has a high iq. [laughter] and he that beautiful name sunu. i love that name. we use to murmur that name on the new york subway. and eventually i wrote a poem called "if you knew what sunu." [laughter] i sent the poem to the editor of the "nation" i had done a column. until i swit
interviewed professor john l. jackson jr. about his book racial paranoia. the interview was conducted at the university of pennsylvania annenberg school of communication. .. is. >> i argue when you think about a country like united states trying to work after its own history of racial antagonism, 1 mile is we transcend to build a multiracial community but posters reality by oppression hopefully we will move beyond it. but they both fall under that umbrella. >> host: go to the second example of a ignoring race. why it's important? >> it is important not to make a fetish but not to discuss it means it is already in the room but we have to be careful that is the historical position we have been through this but now to move forward to pretend we have not run this are already? to know what we want the community to become the look of the differences that divide us. it is a fine ninth to make too much or make a fetish are everyone could have a vested interest. >> host: professor jackson what is the role of political correctness? at. >> guest: it is easy to take the pot shot but it tries to p
to sort of talk a -- at 1940, i'm sorry 1820. he writes a letter to john adams and he says our duty as americans is teen neologism he creates the word. jefferson him is creating all these words and some of them -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire but for the footstool. there are 114 words now and the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson as a corner or the introducer and the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. i'm sorry. mona craddock meaning a person who is in a single room. the one that he does the most with and becomes the most egregious with the purest and the language police is the word be little. he creates the word be little and he knows he is creating something that is going to be very disturbing and noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact he wanted to know webster's teachers at yale who writes noah webster about the word be little and the british hate the word when fowler comes up with modern english usage in 1938 in the first edition. fowler is still
'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty as americans is to neologize, to create new phrases. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the foot stool. he creates -- there's just, there are 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, that's teddy roosevelt. monocrat meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one he does probably the most with and becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creates the word belittle, he knows what he's up to. he knows he's creating something that's going to be very disturbing. noah webster himself loves the word. in fact, one of noah webster's teachers at yale writes noah webster a letter about the word "belittle," and it extends -- the british hate the wor
in that period of time to improve the well-being of the united states with this investment consumption. >> john, when we were speaking the folder your talk, he mentioned to me the extent of the fred's involvement in the micromanagement. just give us a couple examples. it was so mind-boggling. >> people do not realize how bad dogfighting case because it is i believe a very conscious effort to take over the financial system in the united states. if you want to control an economy, control the allocation of capital. the way to do this safely is in the background. socialism does not work if everybody could see the government run businesses fail. if you can blame somebody, then it's a great way to do it. credit allocation in the united states, like the federal reserve acyclic controlling. they haven't made any big as yet, but the rolling them out. the so-called consumer compliance is credit allocation. not only can they make banks, keep banks that can make you offer products, kind of like subprime lending. you're going to see subprime consumer lending so the government can force allocation. they can
. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an activist before she met martin luther king so from that angle as well as wanting to tell the story
-town in south africa. c-span: and john lewis. >> guest: john lewis, young man grew up stuttering, preaching to chickens in rural alabama, went to college in ashbel, became a screen writer on one of the shock troops and the most devoted of king's followers on the students and is now a congressman from -- she's my mom and dad's, from the fifth district of atlanta. c-span: james bevel. >> guest: james bevel, john the baptist of the -- front of the john lewis' out of the national movement with his wife die and who was kind of face to all bones of the freedom rides coo kids in their early 20s to lead the freedom rides, then went on to recommend the use of children when the birmingham movement was suffocated. and later in testament the children who were bombed in birmingham in 1963, they really devised as their response to the bombing what became the selma voting rights movement to win the right to vote for minorities across the south. c-span. wachtel. >> guest: harry wachtel, dr. king's lawyer, one of the early corporate and merger lawyers in new york city whose conscience stirred him because hi
? first, you interviewed the people who are still alive. john connolly himself was very helpful to me. he had a great ranch in south texas with a stable of quarter horses, used to come to the guest house where i would stay very early in the morning, 5:30 or 6:00 and we would go and sit on the top railing of the fence watching the mexicans exercise the quarter horses and he would tell me about -- he answered almost every question that i asked about anything in johnson's career but took me through the assassination in great detail. among the things he said was everybody thought when they heard the shots that with the motorcycle backfire or that it was a balloon going off for a firecracker but he said i was a hunter. i knew the instant i heard that it was the crack of a hunting rifle. i talked to everyone who was with lyndon johnson in the hospital, still alive, who was in hospital with lyndon johnson, congressman jack brooks, lyndon johnson's secretary, kennedy, secretary, i have learned there always seems to the other sources that have been overlooked. when i was doing this, suddenly i cam
at the center of this story in some respects because it's thanks to bp and john brown, the longtime sew -- ceo of bp, that i actually got into this business. and so at the beginning of the 1990s i was with john brown flying into russia as he sent the first teams of bp people to look over various possibilities. and we went to places like west siberia where a new democratic government had taken over in the wake of a coup or near coup. of course, we remember the late period of bp and of john brown which was less happy, but in those days he was really the embodiment of the entrepreneur and true. and his vision was that russia was the place to be, but it happened in a way that he never imagined. it happened because through a combination of flukes and circumstances he was able to gain for bp access to one of the prime developed areas, one of what they call in the oil business brown field areas of russia. and in particular the one field that had been the prime field in soviet days called -- [speaking in native tongue] he was able to get an opportunity to gain control of that field in that area and th
and daniel webster and john c. calhoun and others were debating. imagine a much smaller senate chamber crowded with men who hated each other, although two although, a room reeking of cigar smoke, smelling of gas from gas lamps. carpets with spittoons scattered here and there misfitting in one direction or another, and it intends, congested atmosphere with political man and a great gladiatorial arena of america. postcode was there on the compromise? >> guest: henry clay had been in retirement. he was called out of retirement in kentucky to take charge of an attempt to create some kind of a compromise. he was not missed a great compromise their for the compromise of 1820, missouri compromise and most of the 1833 compromise over south carolina's nullification of federal law. henry clay was a grand, remarkable man i never wanted to say no when he was invited to speak to the center political intentions. so he returned to washington and let the debate for seven months, attempting to persuade congressmen for the right and left, south and north to agree to a grand compromise that would solve t
as john mccain said you can account for the 9% popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers and we felt that by focusing on the converse, we could both diagnose the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. its chemical is one of those prescriptions? >> one of those prescriptions is very simple which is congressmen need exercise, leadership by mixing mind sets by putting aside the campaign mindset long enough to govern and adopting the compromising mind set. in order to do that they need relationships so they can spend more time in washington and less time raising money and people will say that's going to hurt them in the next election but we say that the politicians didn't enter politics just to stand on principle. very few people said politicians were entrusted to politics because they were the most principled people in the population they were in the public's because they want the government that takes the leadership and relationships. we have a phrase that is familiarity attend. there is no accident that ted kennedy
for reelection. against john kerry, but voters by a small margin seen to believed bush would be the better leader. it cannot be said that the vote reflected a favorable referendum on george w. bush's first term. the importance of the communication skills of a candidate cannot be discounted as a factor, however. but all of this misses a different evaluation that merits being taken into account in judging between an income, barack obama, and his challenger, mitt romney. that is the chinks of the second term on too many presidents. 27 of 19 presidents -- only seven of 19 presidents elected to a second term avoid having a troubled or failed second term. that would give the country about a 30% chance of obama and the nation experiencing an improved security of economic climate. after four years if obama is reelected. i do not suggest that the gamble should not be taken. simply, that history into playing with politics might give us pause. so what does history predicted about a second term for barack obama lacks were he reelected with so few presidents having success at that time in office. what are the
to tears. but that's not a hard thing because he's like speaker john boehner. [laughter] but the important thing is that his words spread throughout great britain, especially the phrase even to the end. he threw a lifeline to the british people and they never forgot it. during that time he was in england, there was a period of six weeks that he stayed with subsequent visits to the country during the war. hopkins would stay with winston churchill's country house. clementine was famous for not being prone to get along with people that she did not know. he was very discriminating. but she got along famously with hopkins. he had a good sense of humor and she was amused by his constant complaints to her about it she long underwear. so he would be in the downstairs bathroom shivering in his long overcoat that was made of wool and his scarf and hat. working on his memos and cable. and she would mother him at night. he would be kept up well over night drinking brandy. she would put a hot water bottle between the sheets, which she did. and she was entranced by hopkins touch with her often grumpy hu
us. .. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, john. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. there were two bills at national review and in the conservative movement. two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star who lit up the sky and william rusher, and never wavering north star by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. many have written about william f. buckley jr. that irresistible renaissance man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in-depth portrait of the other bill, william rusher. who among his other solutes for contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee. that was critical because if there had been no draft goldwater committee there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964 and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan political star overnight and led to his running for governor of califor
out to coca-cola. they have a twitter account that is doc pemberton. it's, dr. john pemberton is the pharmacist who invented coca-cola. so now they have the twitter page for him. he speaks in old-timey language and talks about riding on horses. so i sent him a drawing that i had dope when i was a child. -- done when i was a child. when i was 8 years old, i was still into coca-cola. i sent him a picture, and he said, oh, that's great. i wonder what you can do now? so i sent him another picture of a pemberton wipe coca-cola bottle. there was actually alcohol in it. alcohol was prohibited before cocaine was in georgia at the time, so they had to take the alcohol out. that's when they added the caffeine to give you an extra kick, and the that was the west african cola nut. hence, the coca and the cola. so i sent him that picture, and he's like, oh, that's great too. i love it. don't show the polar bears, they might go after you. basically, i was trying to reel him in because, actually, i have another question about the single convention on narcotic drugs -- [laughter] and how do y
, probably the worst dog in history, john kennedy, followed closely by lyndon johnson, there's ample opportunity. i may have to stretch the to e three or four. [laughter] perhaps the series will send my kids to college. so thanks for that. yes. >> during your historical research, have you discovered similar stories about the private lives of justices of the supreme court, or are they just above reproach? >> yeah, okay. the question about the private lives of justices of the supreme court and other politicians. like i said, the more things change. what you find is throughout history the drama, the plot stays the same in this great production of history, the actors change. early presidents were struggling with issues of privacy. for example, john quip si adams' wife, she was a very private woman, and they had a poor marriage. they fought a lot. and she kind of blamed her husband for some problems the children had. one of the kids may have committed suicide or may have been drunk and fallen off a boat and drowned, we're not sure. so she blamed him and was angry about that. supreme court
. that was when my first teaching job a few years ago. i was a john wesley young research professor in the math department. >> great contributed to math and computer science. >> a great place to start your academic career. anyway, my thesis was written in probability. i didn't statistics also. i just wanted to make a few comments before coming to my question. you spent a lot of time in the book about -- i was teaching a business stat course which a colleague of mine described cynically as follows, i asked him what's the difference between business stat and sophisticated business stat course is one in which every observation and your data set has a dollar sign in front of it. anyway, i spent time -- you can't prove simple limit theorem in a basic course. beautiful mathematics but you are just way over the heads of students. but anyway, you can get an intuitive description of what the theorem says. it was my reward after doing that, student evaluations at the end of the semester. professor, you talk too much. you explain to much. cut out the smalltalk, just give us the formulas. and so, i mean, i
that before? >> guest: some of them you have heard. one of them's the case of john and judy selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. they were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our web site $90,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days you'll owe us $3.1 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government's doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland even though there is no water or stream or pond on the land. >> host: so as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> guest: we've looked at some of these things, and we've now constructed legislation to try to fix them. so like on the wetlands we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into navigable waters. i don't have any problem with that. but your backyard is not a navigable water, and dirt is not a blew tax. so we try to -- pollutant. so we try to redefine the clean water act to make sure we're not putting people in prison for putt
picture taken alongside of john f. kennedy. he is so proud. he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected at turner -- eternal jenrry -- attorney general. this is something that everyone knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes the office candidate for the rhodes fellowship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother are the beauty queens who are flirtatious and attractive. that is really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary them. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org.
such as jane goodall goodall, bill moyers, and supreme court justice john paul stevens. go to the web site at progressive forum houston .org. we're glad to give away free books just a year negative sure your ticket stub. supreme or rules to not allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present, or future but we will delved deep into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world" and i also left. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a best seller but because of a passive american success story required reading in his closing colleges i am amazed at the evils we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation point saw. urine people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book i was especially impressed of her and her brother as kids doing their homework with their mother who was also doing her's steading to becoming a registered nurse. two generations encouraging each other. to me, justice sotomayor success story should replace should replace the ratio alger myth from determinati
to get into community organizing. he was trying to get john surry could. he applied for a job in chicago got elected mayor there. he didn't get anything. so the best he could do was stay in new york. he didn't want to go back to honolulu. he didn't have anyplace else, so we stayed there and as he put it, he would try and make money for a year, so he got a job at sort of a magazine/consulting outfit called douglas international for about a year and he really didn't like it there. it was sort of in the business world, which held no interest to him. that is. when when they talked a lot endocytic. when he met genevieve. >> host: david maraniss, this could go back to the quote we started this program was. no product to be more than the randomness that barack obama appeared chicago became random, the fact he got to chicago? >> guest: i wouldn't quite call a friend because the election of harold washington as the first african american mayor of chicago is very attracted to him. chicago is a point to be at that point. as i read in the book come within a six-month period, three people write in ch
john paul stevens. just go to our web site at houston.org. that is progressive forum houston.org. we are pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket at the distribution table in the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by blue willow bookshop. after justice sotomayor's presentation she will join me for a q&a. i should say that supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present or future but we will delve deeply into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world," and i also laughed. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a bestseller. it will become a classic american success story and required reading in high schools and colleges. i am amazed at the e-mails we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation points. young people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book, i was especially impressed by the scene of sonia and her brother junior as kids doing their homework with their mother, wh
a twitter account that is doc pemberton. it's dr. john pemberton is the pharmacist who invented coca-cola. so now they have a twitter page for him. he speaks in an old time language and talks about riding on horses. so i sent him a drawing that i had done when i was a child. when i was 8 years old, i was still into coca-cola, so i sent him a picture. oh, that's great, i love it. i wonder what you can do now? well, i can do this. i sent him another picture of a pemberton wine coca bottle which is what koch -- what coke was before it was coca-cola. the irony, it was prohibited before cocaine was in georgia at the time. that's when they added the calf fee, and that was the cola nut, the west african cola nut. so i sent in that picture, and he's like, oh, doc pell bear tennessee's like that's great, too, i love it. don't show the polar bears, they might go after you. basically, i was trying to reel him in. actually, i have another question about the convention on narcotic drugs -- [laughter] and how do you feel about how coca-cola has access to coca and yet, you know, the indigenous peop
. >> are you planning on going back very soon? >> yes. [laughter] >> so, i understand that why clough john started a foundation and raised an enormous amount of money. the money disappeared. he is under investigation. can you give some substance to that whole story? >> why clough is in the book as well. very interesting guy interesting character by his own right. the thing is best known for in the course of the story of 2010 is that he wanted to become president of the republic of haiti and actually mounted a very promising campaign until a last minute when he was left off the ballot. depending on who you ask. at that time his financial problems both personal and the party from haiti his charity ngo were factored into that. i would say interestingly enough even though he was quite common knowledge in haiti that there was a widespread allegations of unpaid taxes in misspent money that had gone to as a group, most people that i was talking to, the haitians who lived there, didn't really care all that much. they were much more interested in his promise as somebody basically who could lift the
was a newspaper boy. an honorable way to begin. it's so i got my start. he gets his first john upton at the daily "herald", an afternoon newspaper down and bollocks to gulfport purely serendipitously where i got my start. he portrays himself quite openly and but as a very gullible reporters. i certainly hope that when you bought the book and have had a chance to look at the you will be as entertaining as we were by some of his early stories of falling for ruses and having great faith that everyone was telling him the truth, as you find out later they weren't always telling the truth. of course, he then begins to develop a reputation that is very tough, hard-nosed investigative reporter which could soon be applicable * and sense and fleeing to the atlanta constitution where he continued to get be about. he did some just break through investigative reporter that we will hear about tonight. beyond that he was just terrific, shoot. he was just a great reporter. it's easy to overemphasize just that it was investigated. his career was also above standing for the first amendment he worked with a number
to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i am a special forces officer by profession. so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do or did. it'll let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published. a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows , the guerrilla in history by robert aspirate. that book from 1975 until now really has been the sort of a benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that is a long time for a book tour keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think his book is being replaced not. max has done that. with this book which is on sale outside, invisible armies, he, i think, has set the new benchmark for the subject area. his book is very, very comprehensive. it is somewhat chronological, but not entirely. it is somewhat regional, but not entirely, and it is somewhat not functional is the right word, but topical, but not entirely. that sounds like it is not orga
that got me involved in all of this stuff, and john reid later on -- were both, i think, senate senate -- significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people, i think meeting mandela, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro, he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt, and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalized you in cuba, one of the first times we nationalized foreign banks, and then you offset on our reserves. so, you know, we're kind of even here. and this was in nicaragua with orr ortega who was running the sandinista government who's now back again putting this together. certainly fascinating there. i mean, i could run through so many people. i had to, one of the sessions with mandela i was asked to tell mr. mugabe who was then president of zimbabwe and is still president of zimbabwe that he'd used all his time up. and he wasn't very happy with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, asked me if i would chair at the 50th anniversar
got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on. were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people like, i think meeting mondello, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalize you in cuba, one of the first time who did was nationalist the foreign banks, and then you offset our reserves. so we're kind of evening. this was in nicaragua. certainly fascinating. i mean, i could run through so many people. one of the sessions with mondello, i was asked to tell mr. mole gabi, who was then president of zimbabwe and as the president of zimbabwe that he used all his time. he wasn't very happy with that. because of that i was able to do that our secretary of commerce ron brown asked me if i would cheer at the 50th anniversary in admissions the africa lunch that the us was getting at that time, which it did because he said look, if you can do that, then you can take everything else. so i
and new william and john steinbeck and was going to be a writer. and they had all of these things, writings that he'd done in his trunk, and then madeleine's brother later went into the trunk, and there was nothing there. that's sort of the, you know, the fantastic life of stanley dunham. >> host: willie loman? >> guest: and madeleine, you know, had these greater ambitions. >> she, you know, her role model was bette davis. she wanted to be sophisticated, and can the moment she marries stan dunham, she realizes she's the one who's going to have to carry the load in this relationship. of she was incredibly dependable, um, and was, you know, rose to the office of vice president of a bank in hawaii. president obama when i interviewed him described them as characters out of "mad men" which i found really interesting, and he said testifies a deslow today of that very popular hoe and that his -- show and that his grandmother madeleine was like peggy who rises from being a secretary to one of the great ad people in that show. so, you know, he's -- it wasn't always easy for barry as a teen
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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